After 2 full days of driving back from Uluru, trees, reasonably priced fuel and people in general were a welcome sight. Actually I take that back, fuel has been anything but reasonably priced since we left Sydney. We blazed onwards to start the fabled boring trek across the Nullabor Plain – about 1400km of straight and relative treeless – certainly uninhabited road.

 

We stayed at a great beach at Starvation Bay in the Eyre Peninsula near Ceduna before really getting started with more monotonous driving; interestingly there was more than one token crazy guy camped up next to us who looked like he’d been there a few years – we were sandwiched in by them and their weird baked-bean ways.

 

The trip across the Nullabor lived up to our expectations of being gloriously sh*&, but gave us ample time to rationalise our CD collection, argue about Australia having too many stupid laws (hot topic of the trip thus far) and of course, practice our golf. At the Nullabor roadhouse we handed over a ridiculous deposit and wandered outback to play the 6th hole on the Nullabor links golf course (apparently the worlds longest course?). I was doing tremendously well up until my second stroke, when I hit a perfectly straight and long ball which rolled to a stop only to be gobbled by an enormous black raven and carried away. Joe claims the same thing MUST have happened to his ball, because he just couldn’t find it anywhere…

 

The coolest part of the Nullabor was driving off the highway a few hundred metres to get to the very edge of the precarious and dramatic cliffs that span the coast.

 

When we finally reached Bordertown (it’s a border, not a town) we were still atleast 800km from anywhere, and ended up camping in a layover on the side of the road. Don’t tell mum.

 

We found a ‘shortcut’ down to Esperance along a 4WD track. Although we were advised not to take it at the roadhouse, another couple (Nigel and Tina) who’d been on the road with their offroad camper for TWO YEARS wanted to have a crack at it too, so we set off in convoy along the corrugations stopping for a cup of tea and some valuable advice on tyre pressure, and surviving on the road.

 

Finally arriving to see dramatic rocky outcrops, white sand beaches and azurey blue water at Cape Le Grand NP near Esperance, the journey all started to make sense; if I were Western Australia and had something this beautiful, I’d want to keep South Australia as far away from it as possible too. And WIND. Did I mention it’s the windiest place on earth?